Reads: The Picture Of Dorian Grey

10:00 AM

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Delicately creepy. Two, out of many words that I would describe this book. Although it took me awhile to sit down and read it (stupid life, getting in the way of books), I was enamored each time I did open it. 

Dorian Gray is the subject of painter Basil Hallward, a youthful, beautiful subject who Basil holds on a pedestal and claims for his muse. During one of his sittings, Basil introduces Dorian to his friend Lord Henry Wotton, whom Dorian becomes extremely close with fast. Henry talks to Dorian about his ideologies of life, that the only things worth pursuing are beauty, and fulfillment of the senses. Both men continuously shower Dorian with compliments about his youth and appearance, so much so that when Basil reveals his painting of his subject, Dorian  panics about aging.  He wishes for the painting to absorb the years to come, so that Dorian may remain youthful. 

Dorian's wish is granted, and the painting begins to change. However, with the painting absorbing Dorian's physical aging, it also absorbs the physical corruption that Dorian begins to avoid, while he goes through the motions of living a corrupted life without the repercussions one would normally face. Quite literally. 

I could not help but think of Dorian as a pseudo-vampire, with his continuous youth and destructive ways. I really did love this novel, the only actual novel ever written by Oscar Wilde and it was very controversial, and had to be altered. Still, a great story. 

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9 Musings

  1. Oh..you must watch Ben Barnes in Dorian Gray now..He will always be my Dorian Gray now! Cool review!

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  2. This book still has legion of fans. I have a friend that carries it around like the bible.

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  3. So glad you review this book!

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  4. Wow! It sounds awesome Sarah.
    http://www.averysweetblog.com/

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  5. I'm not gonna lie, while reading it I couldn't help but feel a STRONG aversion towards Lord Henry and while I really liked Wilde's writing style and his intention to criticize Victorian society I think that this character didn't allow me to enjoy the novel at its highest grade.

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  6. It is strange, indeed..and way ahead of its time..evidently. Great Expectations is another that I didn't realize was so warped too.

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  7. You are so inspiring to read this. Makes me feel I should go back and try to read Sense and Sensibility now.

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Talk nerdy to me.